WASHINGTON

The mainstream US media disregarded Saturday the Armenian strike on Azerbaijani civilians, which killed more than a dozen including children.

Prominent outlets such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and CNN have failed to carry the attack either on their main pages or world section.

Only The Washington Post shared a story of The Associated Press (AP) on Europe page, which says “Azerbaijan accused Armenia of striking its second-largest city” in the lede, falling short of blaming Armenia.

Reuters only covered a story headlined “Azerbaijan and Armenia allege truce violations, accuse each other in shelling” while the attack was blatantly from the Armenian side.

Early Saturday, at least 13 civilians were killed, including four women and three minors, and nearly 50 others were injured, when Armenian missiles struck Ganja, the second largest city of Azerbaijan.

Some 20 women and five minors were also among the injured, while two children are still missing, the Prosecutor General’s Office of Azerbaijan said.

More than 20 houses were also destroyed in the attack.

It was Armenia’s second deadly assault on Ganja in less than a week, an area far from the front line with a population of half a million.

Along with Ganja, a hydroelectric power plant in Mingachevir was also targeted by the Armenian army at around 1 a.m. local time Saturday (2100GMT Friday), but its missiles were neutralized by Azerbaijan’s air defense.

Since new clashes erupted between the two countries on Sept. 27, Armenia has continued its attacks on civilians and Azerbaijani forces.

As of midday Saturday, Armenia has killed at least 60 Azerbaijani civilians and injured 270 more, according to Azerbaijani officials.

The number of houses damaged in Armenian attacks has reached 1,704, along with 90 residential buildings and 327 civil facilities, according to the Prosecutor General’s Office of Azerbaijan.

Copyright 2020 Anadolu Agency. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.