Turkey: Condolences pour in post Ankara attack

Condolences from around the world are continuing to pour into Turkey following Saturday’s horrific twin bombings in Ankara that killed at least 97 people.

Condolences from around the world are continuing to pour into Turkey following Saturday’s horrific twin bombings in Ankara that killed at least 97 people.

ANKARA - Condolences from around the world are continuing to pour into Turkey following Saturday’s horrific twin bombings in Ankara that killed at least 97 people.

Bosnia and Herzegovina’s Islamic Union Chairman Husein Kavazovic expressed his condolences with Turkish president, prime minister and religious affairs head over the incident.

"We pray to God that such events don’t occur again. We share the pain of the Turkish nation. May God help you. We wish mercy of God on those who lost their lives in the attack and patience to their relatives and a speedy recovery to the injured," Kavazovic said in a letter.

The Sultanate of Oman also expressed condolences in a written statement and condemned the attack.

"The sultanate expresses its sincere condolences and sympathy to the families of the victims and stands with the Turkish Republic and the friendly Turkish people to overcome these crises," the statement said.

South African President Jacob Zuma also joined world leaders in condemning the attack. He extended his condolences to the government of Turkey and the families of victims.

“South Africa shares in the grief of the Turkish people following the substantial loss of life and wishes the injured survivors a speedy recovery,” Zuma said in a statement.

Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn also sent a message of condolence to the Turkish government, describing the attacks as "horrendous and deplorable".

He said that the Ethiopian people and government stood by the Turkish people and government of Turkey in this hour of grief. He also extended his condolences to the bereaved families.

Djiboutian President Ismail Omar Guelleh said that the people and government of the horn of Africa nation deplored the attack.

“Djibouti considers this terrorist attack as a deplorable crime and as part of present threat posed against global peace and security,” Guelleh’s statement to Turkish president said.

On Saturday, two explosions outside Ankara’s main train station killed at least 97 people who had gathered for a peace rally. The deadliest attack in recent Turkish history also left hundreds of people wounded.

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